30 days of quality content to deliver

Since I’ve now already given up on August (and summer), I might as well jump into September with both feet, right?  To do that, I’m going to attempt what I’ve previously thought impossible:  Generating good content for 30 days in a row.  Conveniently, that’s the same number of days as September!

I tripped over this concept a few days ago here.  It’s an intriguing idea (ok, maybe a little gimmicky), especially for someone who likes to think that on-demand writing isn’t necessarily going to be the best kind of writing.  Like this great braised short rib, intriguing and engaging writing takes some time to simmer before it’s ready.

Heck, though, if short bursts of exercise are actually better for your fitness, and “cleansing” is all the rage for dieters, I figure that “30 Days of Content” can basically accomplish both for me, but (hopefully) in a more metaphysical way.  Of course, I’ve already been warned that most people quit after a week and go back to their regular habits of blogging whenever they feel like it, which is to say probably not enough for it to qualify as blogging.  I still have a day job, too, and it’s coming along quite well, thanks for asking.

So, here I go — rather, here I went since this is Day No. 2, and already posted yesterday.

You may be wondering, why?  Or, rather, WHY?!?!

Good question.

When you think about it, writing regularly shouldn’t be that hard.  After all, we tend to do an incredible amount of writing every day when you consider the numbers of emails, texts, comments, etc. that fill each passing hour.  Stringing together a few hundred coherent, interesting words every day for a month should take time, but not hours and certainly not days.

In starting my new business, I wanted to focus on writing as a significant aspect of the value that I would bring to my clients.  Interestingly, when I starting selling to legal marketers and lawyers, several friends informally contacted as references for me actually wondered whether I would do the actual writing.  It was a fair question, since I had spent quite a few years as a bigshot CMO at an AmLaw 100 law firm.  Would I really lower myself to the task?  Well, the answer is a resounding yes.  And the feedback from the friends has something to do with the value we place on writing, and maybe content in general.

See, “writers” nowadays are plentiful.  Sadly, there are a lot of former journalists — and lawyers — out there looking for work.  These folks are now a dime a dozen, it seems.

Except good writers aren’t.  Good content certainly isn’t.  And, as it turns out, law firms and businesses are willing to pay for both.  As a startup, I had pegged my hourly rate close to the top of what I had been told was “the range.”  Last week, a client told me that I should raise my rates given the quality that I deliver.  Is there higher praise than that?  When was the last time a client told you that they wanted to pay you more???

Now for the point:  Quality don’t come from nowhere, as they say.  Like an pro athlete, actor or musician, a professional writer has to practice the craft.  A lot.  What better way to keep in top writing form than to take up a challenge to produce good content for 30 days straight?

Have any ideas for content you’d like to see?  Let me know in the comments.  I’ve already sat down and outlined at least a couple dozen ideas for blog posts, and I’m sure I will think of more.  As I’ve said before, it may not always be about legal or marketing (or both), but I hope it’s always interesting.

And now that’s two down, 28 to go.

 

 

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5 comments

  1. Welcome to the challenge! Great start. 🙂 See you at the end!

  2. John, another great post. I like your style and can see why your clients do also. It’s natural and honest. I’m looking forward to reading more from you.

  3. Hey John,

    It’s crazy to think how much writing we actually do (texts, emails, etc.,) but when it comes to content, it gets tough.

    Hearing clients tell you that you’re worth more than you charge is always a plus. I’d recommend writing a post on “how to price your services for success.” 🙂

    That’s a hard subject for a lot of people!

    -Josh

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